THE SANTA FE PRESIDIO REAL CABALLADA IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

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THE SANTA FE PRESIDIO REAL CABALLADA IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

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Maintaining the Santa Fe presidio horse herd, (real caballada) from the marauding Indians was a challenge for the eighteenth century New Mexico governors and military officers.  Without horses, the presidio soldiers and the auxiliary Pueblo Indians were unable to defend themselves from or make counter-attacks upon the Apaches of various kinds, Utes, Navajos, and especially the Comanches.

After the Pueblo Revolt, these tribes had become expert horseman, raiding the Spanish and the settled Indians successfully.  This eighteenth century document shows that the presidio officers, and governor, (Governor Olavíde de Micheleña), were very aware of the need for more and better maintained horses.   

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5 page article. Automatically delivered via PDF.

EXPANDED ARTICLE PUBLISHED AS:
“The Pastures of the Royal Horse Herd of the Santa Fe Presidio 1692-1740”

in All Trails Lead to Santa Fe ISBN: 978-0-86534-76-1

Thumbnail Public Domain from the Library of Congress